Tag Archives: walking

Shaftesbury: a long walk among our landmark trees

IN June, 2018, the Shaftesbury Tree Group published a walking map taking in the best examples of old and important trees in the centre of our hilltop town (see link below). Now the group has created a second walk, based on a circular amble around the town’s perimeter. Both maps are brilliantly illustrated by landscape artist Gary Cook, who lives just outside Shaftesbury.

View and read the first map: Shaftesbury: walk landmark trees with glorious views
The story of the second map: Read (and listen to) an interview with Gary Cook, plus Sue Clifford and Angela King from the Tree Group

A LONGER WALK AMONG OUR ANCIENT TREES

This walk may take one and a half to two hours: it depends on how many gates you lean upon and muse. It begins and ends with steep hills and in part follows roads, some without pavements. We circuit the base of the greensand spur on which Shaftesbury’s medieval centre stands, more than 100ft/30m above.

Even at the bottom of the hill there are long views outwards to Melbury Hill, Duncliffe Woods and across the hedged fields to the rim of chalk hills that contain the Blackmore Vale. Glimpses up the slopes reveal steep woodland cover, some planted – the pines and beech, some spontaneous growth – birch, ash, sycamore, field maple and more.

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Run and walk the challenging hills of North Dorset

The Ox Races at Rushmoor Estate: there will be five different events in 2019. Dressing up is not discouraged

NORTH DORSET is made for running. It’s rural and lumpy, which means quiet country lanes, lots of off-road running, glorious views and challenging terrain.

Shaftesbury is the gateway to three marathons: Cranborne Chase, the Rushmoor Estate (including Larmer Tree Gardens) and the North Dorset marathon, which wends through 10 villages and outstanding countryside. Dorset’s White Star Running operates several more events besides, from 24-hour events to running with kids and dogs. It’s serious, and fun.

There are also now two parkruns within 10 miles of the town, the latest on an airfield where four Tiger Moths and a Russian-owned acrobatic team are based – bring your binoculars when heading out for a 5km Saturday morning run.

There is so much choice to run fast or potter slowly. And where there be hills and running, there be lots of magnificent established walking trails. The Wessex Ridgeway and North Dorset Trailway (a former rail line) are close by, while the 50-mile White Hart Link is a trail linking the five North Dorset towns, including Shaftesbury. It’s now taking shape and being trailmarked. Some sections are complete, and the route will be complete in 2021.

Shaftesbury itself has a superb tree walk, and nearby Gillingham – on the main rail line from London to Exeter – has established walks around the old hunting forest of King John.
Find out more below and bring your walking and running shoes to Shaftesbury! We look forward to welcoming you.

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A royal forest and a new 50-mile trail: the Gillingham Walking Festival

AN ancient royal forest and a new 50-mile trail are the focus of this year’s nine-day Gillingham Walking Festival.

The White Hart Link is the new long-distance route which links the five towns of North Dorset: Gillingham, Stalbridge, Sturminster Newton, Blandford and Shaftesbury.

It’s so named as the Blackmore Vale was once known as the Vale of the White Hart, a “creature whose rarity and beauty have attracted, in legend, a wealth of mystical and royal associations,” says a report in The Guardian.

It was also described by Thomas Hardy in Tess of the D’Urbervilles. “The Vale was known in former times as the Forest of White Hart, from a curious legend of King Henry III’s reign, in which the killing by a certain Thomas de la Lynd of a beautiful white hart which the king had run down and spared, was made the occasion of a heavy fine.”

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